August 21, 2017

Book Review: The Man Who Loved Libraries

When he was a child in the 1840s, Andrew Carnegie and his family immigrated to America in search of a new beginning. His working-class Scottish family arrived at the height of the Industrial Revolution. Carnegie worked hard, in factories and telegraphy. He invested in railroads, eventually becoming the richest man in the world during his time. 

Carnegie believed strongly in sharing his wealth, and one of the ways he did this was by funding the construction of over 2,500 public libraries around the world. His philanthropy completely revolutionized public libraries, which weren’t widespread at the time. 

Told in simple, lyrical text, the story unfolds against striking, stylized illustrations that transport readers to the bustle and boom of the Industrial Revolution. An informational spread explains more about Carnegie’s life and work.When he was a child in the 1840s, Andrew Carnegie and his family immigrated to America in search of a new beginning. His working-class Scottish family arrived at the height of the Industrial Revolution. Carnegie worked hard, in factories and telegraphy. He invested in railroads, eventually becoming the richest man in the world during his time.



5 Stars
The story and unique illustrations of  The Man Who Loved Libraries create a wonderful way for elementary aged children to learn about Andrew Carnegie. The overriding message of how he always gave back because of that kindness was given to him, really makes this book stick with a young reader.  After the story, there is a section describing Andrew Carnegie's legacy and some of the structures he built.



August 14, 2017

Book Review: Sing Freedom




This is a true story about Estonia, a small European nation that won its freedom from the former Soviet Union by showing that the spirit of a people is stronger than tanks and bullets. They showed their spirit by doing what they have always loved doing: raising their voices together in song. Sing Freedom! captures the essence of this successful nonviolent revolution in a format highly accessible to children. The conflict that eventually won the Estonians their freedom could have had a very violent outcome. This story tells the history of the oppression of the Estonian people and how they gained their freedom through non-violent means.

Click Here to Pick Up Sing Freedom on Amazon











5 Stars

The colorful illustrations and wonderfully told history of Estonia's musical journey to freedom make this a great selection for teaching history to children. I especially liked the point made that people sang to make a non-violent push for freedom. What a wonderful lesson to learn along side of all of the violence children are subjected to through the media and entertainment outlets. 






July 31, 2017

Chapter Book Review: Wilf the MIghty Worrier





Things Wilf was worried about before: 1. Fish sucking his toes when he goes for a paddle. 2. Garden gnomes coming to life. 3. Losing his 'How to Stop Worrying' leaflet. 
Things Wilf is worried about now: 1. Alan coming on holiday to Africa with him. 2. Alan raising an army of terrifying animals in his quest for world domination. 3. Being the only person who can stop Alan. As usual.Join Wilf on an animal-tastic jungle adventure, with laughs on every page and exuberant illustrations by the talented Jamie Littler.














4 Stars

Like many children, Wilf worries about things. Lucky for him he has a pamphlet with all kinds of strategies to help him deal with the many things that keep him awake at night. This was a cute book and the silliness of the situations would appeal to a young reader.  The characters go to Africa and are able to talk to the animals through a crazy invention. I especially liked Kevin the dog who rerouted every conversation to include giving him a dog treat.